Bentley Challenges Students to Design the Future

When you ask a group of the country’s best up-and-coming art students “what will British luxury mean in 2050?” you can imagine the kind of result that they return. Recently Bentley did exactly that. Could these designs be a vision of the future? We’ll let you decide.

A total of 24 students from the Royal College of Art’s (RCA) Intelligent Mobility programme were asked to submit their designs, with four being selected by RCA’s lecturers as they were particularly thought provoking. With the world quickly becoming more virtual and digital, the artists were challenged to focus on how physical materiality, technology and craftsmanship could be combined in the future. 


‘Luxury Soundscapes’ – Irene Chiu 


Irene’s design is one that focuses on the role of sound in the future of luxury Grand Touring. To that end, it is a vehicle that can selectively mute undesirable and stressful noises, subsequently allowing pleasurable noises to prevail. 

The artist suggests that this consideration into the acoustics of future autonomous cars is one that would also have favourable effects on the general health and wellbeing of passengers that spend frequent periods in their car. 


‘Material Humanity’ – Kate NamGoong

We have our suspicions that Kate might just be a car enthusiast - her design considers the emotion of driving in a future dominated by autonomous cars. In a world where nobody drives anymore, Kate believes that true luxury will be the choice to actually go for the occasional drive in a car that utilises an internal combustion engine. 

For that reason, Material Humanity features styling that harks back to Bentleys of old and an internal combustion engine that is visible to the world; Kate believes that the people of 2050 will want to see the mechanical workings in action – after all, the internal combustion engine will probably be an alien concept to the people of 2050.


‘Material Humanity’ – Kate NamGoong

We have our suspicions that Kate might just be a car enthusiast - her design considers the emotion of driving in a future dominated by autonomous cars. In a world where nobody drives anymore, Kate believes that true luxury will be the choice to actually go for the occasional drive in a car that utilises an internal combustion engine. 

For that reason, Material Humanity features styling that harks back to Bentleys of old and an internal combustion engine that is visible to the world; Kate believes that the people of 2050 will want to see the mechanical workings in action – after all, the internal combustion engine will probably be an alien concept to the people of 2050.


‘Stratospheric Grand Touring’ – Jack Watson


With this one, we’re somewhat moving away from the idea of car’s being the future of mobility; where Jack’s going, he doesn’t need roads. This incredible looking design considers the possibility that, in the future, easily Grand Touring anywhere in the world will be possible with a single vehicle. 

Even though ‘flying cars’ are an idea that has been posed in the past, we can’t help but like the thought of ‘Stratospheric’ Grand Touring and the stunning design of this craft. Jack says that his inspiration comes from Bentley’s near-100-year history of innovation – he’s right, if anyone can make this design a reality, it’s definitely Bentley.


‘Elegant Autonomy’ – Enuji Choi


If you were to make a list of things that are synonymous with Bentley, we’re pretty sure that the terms ‘elegance’ and ‘British etiquette’ would probably make the cut; it’s those two things that inspired Enuji’s design.

After looking at how the etiquette of ingress and egress has evolved over time – from horse-drawn carriages to modern-day cars – Enuji continued the evolution timeline and imagined the additional effects of driverless cars and smart cities.


‘Elegant Autonomy’ – Enuji Choi


If you were to make a list of things that are synonymous with Bentley, we’re pretty sure that the terms ‘elegance’ and ‘British etiquette’ would probably make the cut; it’s those two things that inspired Enuji’s design.

After looking at how the etiquette of ingress and egress has evolved over time – from horse-drawn carriages to modern-day cars – Enuji continued the evolution timeline and imagined the additional effects of driverless cars and smart cities.

As with all design studies, it’s very unlikely that any of these stunning creations will ever actually go any further than computer screens and canvases. Regardless, it’s very interesting to see how the designers of the future think the luxury sector of an autonomous world will manifest itself.

What do you think of these futuristic designs; do you think that they are a true vision of the future? We’d like to hear your thoughts on all of these (and see your design ideas) on Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram.


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