The sales of new Petrol and Diesel cars shall cease in 2040.​

The Government recently announced that, in a move to help reduce air pollution levels, all sales of new petrol and diesel cars and vans will cease in the UK by 2040. 

This decision has come as part of the much anticipated ‘Clean Air Strategy’ – a government strategy that aims to improve air quality in the UK. Whilst concerns about the threat of increased air pollution are nothing new, the issue has continued to worsen in recent history; air quality is now thought to be linked to around 40,000 premature deaths a year and has even been linked with dementia in a recent study that looked at higher rates of the disease in people who lived close to major roads.

Set to take effect by 2040, the change will mean that the sale of all new cars and vans powered by petrol or diesel will entirely cease. Whilst the change will have no effect on used petrol and diesel vehicles, it is predicted by experts that the switch-over to electric cars – that being electric vehicles out-competing petrol and diesel vehicle sales - will have actually already happened in the mid-2020s.

Of course, the rise in all-electric vehicles will have a knock-on effect when it comes to the National Grid and demand for electricity – especially at rush hour times. In fact, it is currently thought that the additional demand would be an increase of 50 per cent over the current peak demand of 61 gigawatts per year. According to The Telegraph: “the additional electricity needed will be the equivalent of almost 10 times the total power output of the new Hinckley Point C nuclear power station being built in Somerset”. In order to cope with this demand, the National Grid has predicted that Britain will become more reliant on imported electricity.

As well as the 2040 ban on new petrol and diesel car sales, Ministers have also unveiled a new £255m fund that will assist councils to tackle air pollution more urgently. With £40m accessible immediately, local Councils will be able to use the funds in a number of ways to reduce emissions instantaneously.

Set to take effect by 2040, the change will mean that the sale of all new cars and vans powered by petrol or diesel will entirely cease. Whilst the change will have no effect on used petrol and diesel vehicles, it is predicted by experts that the switch-over to electric cars – that being electric vehicles out-competing petrol and diesel vehicle sales - will have actually already happened in the mid-2020s.

Of course, the rise in all-electric vehicles will have a knock-on effect when it comes to the National Grid and demand for electricity – especially at rush hour times. In fact, it is currently thought that the additional demand would be an increase of 50 per cent over the current peak demand of 61 gigawatts per year. According to The Telegraph: “the additional electricity needed will be the equivalent of almost 10 times the total power output of the new Hinckley Point C nuclear power station being built in Somerset”. In order to cope with this demand, the National Grid has predicted that Britain will become more reliant on imported electricity.

As well as the 2040 ban on new petrol and diesel car sales, Ministers have also unveiled a new £255m fund that will assist councils to tackle air pollution more urgently. With £40m accessible immediately, local Councils will be able to use the funds in a number of ways to reduce emissions instantaneously.

So far, a number of measures have been discussed and you may soon find that your Local authorities start to change road layouts, upgrade public transport options and even begin to remove speed bumps in favour of alternate traffic calming measures. Should these measures not be enough, we could soon start seeing ‘clean air zones’ that, much like the current congestion zone, require payment based upon vehicle type and time spent in the zone.



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